World

Behind the Scenes of Facebook

Daisy Ridley recently issued a warning on Instagram on the intensity of social media and the strive for perfection. It caught my eye on Facebook, through BBC Radio 1’s article and made me realise how intense social media can be.

golden_rules_of_being_engagedI’ve seen a flurry of engagements and babies, new cars and expensive shopping trips, as well as daily gym half-naked selfies and beautiful healthy meals plague my Facebook, Twitter and Instagram feed. I’m so happy that all my friends are doing well and getting on, achieving their life goals at this stage, but it’s easy to get bogged down in the idea that other people have a better life than you.

 

That’s categorically untrue.

There is immense pressure on young people in particular when they are surrounded by perfect bodies, perfect skin and incredible social lives, to be as good as everyone else. What we see on social media is a heavily edited snippet of others’ lives – something that people have scrutinised over for a considerable time before publishing.

It’s a similar story with my job; as a social media…person..I have to be very careful with what I post on the companies’ Twitter and Facebook pages, to ensure a succinct and coherent message. Posts have to be unique, interesting, positive and have to prove to an audience that the company is very successful and useful to their clients.

People do exactly the same thing with their own personal profiles. They want to convey a specific message – some people even go as far as having their own themes on Instagram, meaning the stream of photos that they can post is even more limited.

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This is not to say that people don’t address negative issues on social media; people can be quite vocal when something bad has happened to them, as they need their friends’ support. People are quick to assume, however, that because a person’s feed is entirely positive that nothing bad is going on behind the scenes. They may be going through a break-up, or they may be facing severe stress at work that they don’t want to publicise, or they may just being going through a rough patch.

Of course, such things aren’t uploaded to Facebook, but instead are kept private. What makes a person feel better is posting joyful things that make them feel happy, as a sort of distraction from what is going on in the real world.

Can we call Facebook a distraction? Is that all it is rather than a real representation of people’s lives? Whether it is or it isn’t, it’s certainly putting pressure on the people that use it, but it’s important to remember (whatever age you are) that Facebook and other mediums are simply highlights of someone’s life and you shouldn’t feel the need to compare your behind the scenes to their show reel.

 

 

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Marketing, Work

Newbie’s Marketing Record

Have a sneaky peek at my other blog Newbie’s Marketing Record (I’m desperate to change the name but I can’t think of anything as appropriate) – an account of what I’m discovering and learning in the world of marketing and social media.

phoneIt’s a collaboration of various sources of good marketing examples and advice, from things like infographs to full blown articles (and it’s starting to look pretty and flashy).

There isn’t much of my own opinion on there because I’m still learning and don’t know much, so I can’t dish out my own advice yet I’m afraid.

The latest post is about whether or not to add subtitles, or closed captions, to a video that will eventually go on Facebook (spoiler: the answer is YES).

I will be eternally grateful :: https://newbiesmarketingrecord.wordpress.com/

Work

[AR] BoS: Discovering the latest business knowledge, expertise and resources

Because I’m AR’s new blogger, I’m posting the links to new articles on every conceivable social media platform. It’s quite business-y and medical related, but you might find it interesting 🙂

On 13th November, Lorna Bowes of Aesthetic Source brought together the members of the Aesthetic Business Network (ABN) for an insightful and dynamic workshop at The Custard Factory in Birmingham. Click here to read more…

Aesthetic Response site

ABN site

Photography

Selfie Culture

There’s an awful lot of talk from the older generation and cynical youths about ‘selfie culture’ – in other words: lots of first world teenagers and young adults are taking continuous pictures of themselves with the convenient front-facing cameras on the latest smart phones. Selfies have bombarded social media, and you can find a sometimes too-close-up of anybody’s face on Twitter, Facebook or, more commonly, Instagram without looking too hard.

It’s difficult to ignore, and it’s difficult to accept, with the idea that it’s horrifically vain and unnecessary. People have screamed ‘Stop taking pictures of your face and your food!’ to no avail, meeting a noisy wall of camera shutters and satisfying digital *pings*.

We’ve had selfies for charity, selfies for good causes, selfies for no reason at all, and it’s been met with a red rage from many internet users.

It’s a different world to what it used to be, but people have always – always – had pictures of themselves. Are we taking into account the royal portraits that adorn the walls of stately homes and castles? What is the difference between a picture of somebody, standing alone and someone who has snapped a picture of their face because they are proud of their make-up?

I don’t look at selfies as vain, or inappropriate. We live in a world that has developed a second nature of putting people down behind the walls of the internet, with no fear. Both women and men alike are scrutinised for how they look and in the current state of things, it feels like nobody can say anything right. So why not celebrate how you look? Some days I wake up on a morning and really struggle to look in the mirror. Other people feel the same and on that one day that they feel good about themselves, they should be entitled to celebrate that online to their friends. They shouldn’t feel nervous about posting their face online because they are contributing to the horrible ‘selfie culture’. Let’s just celebrate people’s looks and their confidence rather than putting everyone down, inadvertently or not.

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